Loved BY FAR The Accessories Label To Lust After

Established by twinnies Valentina and Sabina, along with their bestie Denitsa, BY FAR is the footwear and accessories label that has rocketed in the success-o-sphere in only two years.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

Contemporary and cool, with a hint of the nostalgic courtesy of the square toe shoes a la Rachel from Friends and croc embossed baguette bags. You’ll want them all, as do the celebs and there’s tons of them from Kylie Jenner to Michelle Obama and all the girlies in between.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What’s in the name you’re asking? Well it derives from the names of the founders’ three little boys, who are, naturally, by far their greatest source of pride. Today, the girls split their time between Australia and Europe.

BY FAR designersBY FAR

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What was your first fashion memory? Our generation was the odd one that was raised between the fall of the Communism and the rise of the Internet. Our admiration for fashion was what we saw our mothers wearing, since choice was scarcest each of them were creating their own garments with the resources they could find or buying from the International store with the little dollars they could get. Most of the kids were wearing the same cloths, those dark brown chinos and wool coats; the same goes to our toys, they were made of wood and rubber, very rarely one could see pop-up colors such as pinks and purples. At that time, we didn’t consider ourselves cool and we wanted to have those girly toys and cloths. Now we have great appreciation for our childhood memories, because it was very unique and different. Indeed, all those textures and pallets are considered the epitome of minimalism and chicness, it has driven our perception for style. After the fall of the communism in 1989 came the golden era of the 90s elegance, where we first felt the freedom for more choice and expression of style. We still admire icons such as Carolyn Kennedy, Winona Ryder and Sofia Coppola. Therefore, that decade continues to be the source for inspiration for us.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

How did you get in the industry and how did your label come about? We believe it was all destined. Denitsa’s husband (Vasil) always pushed the idea of creating our own brand, but we didn’t believe we were qualified enough. Randomly he was commissioned to optimise one shoe factory with solar panels. So he came back from the meeting and said to Denitsa “I found the people that will produce your shoes”, obviously she said “You’re completely crazy”. Nevertheless, we decided to meet them and since then we’re working in great harmony together.

What’s the BY FAR signature style? Definitely boots such as SOFIA and BECCA, now more and more people recognize us for barely-there sandals such as TANYA.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What does each of you bring to the label? Denitca is the designer, Sabina is the CEO and I’m overlooking the whole brand image of BY FAR.

Where do you see your brand going? Sky is the limit to us! We have so many ideas and projects up our sleeves, we’re just waiting for the right moment to pursue them.

[“source=forbes]

Loved BY FAR The Accessories Label To Lust After

Established by twinnies Valentina and Sabina, along with their bestie Denitsa, BY FAR is the footwear and accessories label that has rocketed in the success-o-sphere in only two years.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

Contemporary and cool, with a hint of the nostalgic courtesy of the square toe shoes a la Rachel from Friends and croc embossed baguette bags. You’ll want them all, as do the celebs and there’s tons of them from Kylie Jenner to Michelle Obama and all the girlies in between.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What’s in the name you’re asking? Well it derives from the names of the founders’ three little boys, who are, naturally, by far their greatest source of pride. Today, the girls split their time between Australia and Europe.

BY FAR designersBY FAR

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

What was your first fashion memory? Our generation was the odd one that was raised between the fall of the Communism and the rise of the Internet. Our admiration for fashion was what we saw our mothers wearing, since choice was scarcest each of them were creating their own garments with the resources they could find or buying from the International store with the little dollars they could get. Most of the kids were wearing the same cloths, those dark brown chinos and wool coats; the same goes to our toys, they were made of wood and rubber, very rarely one could see pop-up colors such as pinks and purples. At that time, we didn’t consider ourselves cool and we wanted to have those girly toys and cloths. Now we have great appreciation for our childhood memories, because it was very unique and different. Indeed, all those textures and pallets are considered the epitome of minimalism and chicness, it has driven our perception for style. After the fall of the communism in 1989 came the golden era of the 90s elegance, where we first felt the freedom for more choice and expression of style. We still admire icons such as Carolyn Kennedy, Winona Ryder and Sofia Coppola. Therefore, that decade continues to be the source for inspiration for us.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

How did you get in the industry and how did your label come about? We believe it was all destined. Denitsa’s husband (Vasil) always pushed the idea of creating our own brand, but we didn’t believe we were qualified enough. Randomly he was commissioned to optimise one shoe factory with solar panels. So he came back from the meeting and said to Denitsa “I found the people that will produce your shoes”, obviously she said “You’re completely crazy”. Nevertheless, we decided to meet them and since then we’re working in great harmony together.

[“source=forbes]

Fast Fashion Ethics: Should Clothing E-Tailers Be More Transparent?

Image result for Fast Fashion Ethics: Should Clothing E-Tailers Be More Transparent?

On November 27th, execs at fashion e-tailers Boohoo Group, Asos and Misguided attended the second evidence hearing on the sustainability of the fashion industry at the houses of parliament in London. The Committee pushed the three execs – ASOS CEO Nick Beighton, Boohoo.com CEO Carol Kane, who represented both Boohoo and PrettyLittleThing, and Missguided head of product quality and supply Paul Smith – on their manufacturing practices in the English city of Leicester. This followed an earlier hearing on October 30, when the committee heard evidence about below-legal wages and unethical conditions for clothing manufacturing workers.

The current inquiry follows a period of increased scrutiny for the online clothing retailers, as the UK political sphere, under pressure from the public, turns its attention on clothing manufacturing practices. The questionable ethics of sourcing from the top four clothing manufacturing destinations – China, where 21%of garment importers say they source their stock, Bangladesh and India (tied for second place with 14%) and Vietnam (12%) – have been in the public spotlight for several years. Many high-street retailers, notably Primark, H&M, Inditex-owned Zara, source at least a percentage of their garments in these countries. While many have taken widely publicized steps in recent years to ensure the safe working conditions and living wages of their workers, as of the end of 2018, a lot remains to be done. According to the Fashion Transparency Index report, published annually by the non-profit Fashion Revolution, global fashion brands have increased the overall social and environmental transparency of their sourcing practices by just 5% since last year.

Despite this, international sourcing practices remain difficult to police at the government level, which may be one of the reasons why the UK government has taken issue with these four e-tailers in particular – all of which have manufacturing facilities in the UK.

In this week’s hearing, Smith testified that Missguided had reduced its presence in Leicester, after recognizing its inability to satisfactorily audit the factories it was using.  Having started this year working with 35 manufacturers at 80 different sites, the company now sources from 12 suppliers at 20 factories.

Beighton stated his satisfaction with the standards in the factories Asos uses.

Kane defended allegations from the previous hearing that Boohoo’s £5 dresses were responsible for underpaid workers and promoting unsustainable and non-environmental consumer buying patterns.

“We have 80 dresses from over 60,000 styles that are £5. They are loss leaders and we don’t make any money on them, but it’s a marketing technique to drive people to our website,” he said, according to Drapers.

On November 27th, execs at fashion e-tailers Boohoo Group, Asos and Misguided attended the second evidence hearing on the sustainability of the fashion industry at the houses of parliament in London. The Committee pushed the three execs – ASOS CEO Nick Beighton, Boohoo.com CEO Carol Kane, who represented both Boohoo and PrettyLittleThing, and Missguided head of product quality and supply Paul Smith – on their manufacturing practices in the English city of Leicester. This followed an earlier hearing on October 30, when the committee heard evidence about below-legal wages and unethical conditions for clothing manufacturing workers.

The current inquiry follows a period of increased scrutiny for the online clothing retailers, as the UK political sphere, under pressure from the public, turns its attention on clothing manufacturing practices. The questionable ethics of sourcing from the top four clothing manufacturing destinations – China, where 21%of garment importers say they source their stock, Bangladesh and India (tied for second place with 14%) and Vietnam (12%) – have been in the public spotlight for several years. Many high-street retailers, notably Primark, H&M, Inditex-owned Zara, source at least a percentage of their garments in these countries. While many have taken widely publicized steps in recent years to ensure the safe working conditions and living wages of their workers, as of the end of 2018, a lot remains to be done. According to the Fashion Transparency Index report, published annually by the non-profit Fashion Revolution, global fashion brands have increased the overall social and environmental transparency of their sourcing practices by just 5% since last year.

Despite this, international sourcing practices remain difficult to police at the government level, which may be one of the reasons why the UK government has taken issue with these four e-tailers in particular – all of which have manufacturing facilities in the UK.

In this week’s hearing, Smith testified that Missguided had reduced its presence in Leicester, after recognizing its inability to satisfactorily audit the factories it was using.  Having started this year working with 35 manufacturers at 80 different sites, the company now sources from 12 suppliers at 20 factories.

Beighton stated his satisfaction with the standards in the factories Asos uses.

Kane defended allegations from the previous hearing that Boohoo’s £5 dresses were responsible for underpaid workers and promoting unsustainable and non-environmental consumer buying patterns.

“We have 80 dresses from over 60,000 styles that are £5. They are loss leaders and we don’t make any money on them, but it’s a marketing technique to drive people to our website,” he said, according to Drapers.

[“source=forbes]

Katy Perry on her career, meeting the Pope and protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Superstar Katy Perry took time out of her world tour to chat with her good friend Derek Blasberg about love, life on the road and learning to better deal with fame. Here, read the full cover story from Vogue Australia’s August 2018 issue.

It’s exactly 3pm and I’m standing on the corner of Boulevard Saint-Germain and Rue Saint-Benoît in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. I’m wearing a cashmere long-sleeve polo shirt and I’m starting to sweat. Katy Perry, international pop star and my least punctual friend, is 30 minutes late for lunch at Café de Flore and I’m beginning to stress about making my flight back to New York later this evening. I knew this would happen. Last year, when I was Katy’s date to Vanity Fair’s Oscar party, I lied to her and said we needed to be there an hour before we actually needed to be, which meant we arrived only 15 minutes late. The year before that, I escorted her to the Met Gala, and when I arrived to pick her up at our appointed departure time she was still wearing a bathrobe, because she decided to bleach her eyebrows at the last minute.

At 3:10pm, I take out my phone. “Lady, I have a flight,” I text her, feeling the beads of sweat pool under my shirt and dribble down the small of my back.

“Remember when we said we’d meet at 2:30pm and I said I would be late?” she responds. “I never lie.” Dammit, she was right.

Lunch with Katy is always “spicy”, which is the term she just texted to describe my current mood. Beneath her big voice, Katy is a quick-witted pop-culture vulture and a fiery conversationalist. She has an ear for details and a comedic timing that reminds me of a young Lucille Ball. The last time I saw her for lunch in LA she showed up at the Beverly Hills Hotel wearing a baseball cap that said: “New Life: Who Dis?” Under normal circumstances – like when I don’t have a flight to catch and a job to do, which in this case is this interview – I’m happy to wait for her. (For one thing, it’s the ideal time to catch up on Instagram.) But she senses my panic here.

“Are you checking baggage, princess?” she texts. “Literal, not emotional.”

“Every time I fly my emotional baggage is overweight,” I respond.

“Tweet!” responds Katy, who is, incidentally, the number-one most-followed person on Twitter.

“Is this sabotage?” I ask.

“Nah, it’s deeper than that,” she texts. “I want to look my best with full hair and make-up, because I’m self-conscious.”

Having failed to convince me that I won’t miss tonight’s flight, I announce: “I’m starting the interview right now on text!”

“I thought you already did!”

I smile as I read the text and look up from my iPhone to see a silver van barrelling down Boulevard Saint-Germain, closely followed by aggressively driven motor scooters. The van screeches to a halt directly at my feet and out pops Katy wearing a satin spaghetti-strap jumpsuit, her bleached pixie frosted in lilac. The paparazzi hop off their scooters to chase her into the cafe with their cameras, but we’ve already tucked ourselves into comfy booth in a back corner. Like two American tourists, we order French onion soup and a croque madame. I look at my watch, see it’s 3:22pm, and tell her: “You better talk fast.”

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

I’ve worked in the starry swirl of the fashion industry for nearly two decades and in that time I’ve met my fair share of celebrities. But there’s a short list of a few people who transcend merely being famous – and the Pope is on the top of it. Last April, Katy travelled to Rome for an audience with the head of the Catholic Church and this is the first thing I want to talk about. “It started when we were on the Asia leg of the tour and I went to mass with my mom,” Katy tells me. “She hadn’t sung those songs in 40 years and watching her made me cry. It’s so beautiful and humbling to re-centre in a place where it’s not about anything else but reconnecting with the divine.”

As she sings in her 2010 hit with Snoop Dogg, Katy is a true California girl. She was born in picturesque Santa Barbara, and raised by Mary and Keith, two Pentecostal pastors. (Mary was raised Catholic.) Katy started performing as a young girl and left home at 15 to pursue a music career. “I was laser-focused and off to the races from the time I was nine years old,” she says. Unsurprisingly, her first megahit, 2008’s I Kissed a Girl, didn’t go platinum around the family dinner table. “My mom has prayed for me my entire life, hoping I’d come back to God. I never left Him, I was just a little bit secular, I was more materialistic and more career-driven. But now that I’m in my 30s, it’s more about spirituality and heart wholeness.”

Katy is an avid supporter of the David Lynch Foundation, which advocates for transcendental meditation education. Bob Roth, the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation, invited her to speak about her experience and the benefits of meditation at a health conference in Rome co-created by the Pontifical Council for Culture, which she readily accepted. “I’m such a big fan of Pope Francis. It’s a combination of compassion, humility, sternness and refusal. He is rebel – a rebel for Jesus.” Katy lists some papal facts, including that he named himself after Francis of Assisi, her favourite saint, and that he sticks to his vow of poverty despite the lavish surroundings of the Vatican. “He is bringing the Church back to humility and connecting with people. He’s very humble and not frivolous.” He’s also a lover of animals and is often depicted surrounded by wooded creatures, which reminds her of her favourite Disney character, Snow White.

When Katy met the Pope she brought two people with her: her mother and Orlando Bloom. Katy is protective of her love life – blame it on the painful dissolution of her marriage to Russell Brand in 2012, which was all caught on camera in Part of Me, the documentary that followed her California Dreams tour – so I tread into Orlando territory with extreme caution. “It’s okay to mention him,” she says with trepidation.

Here’s the problem: when the love lives of famous people are discussed, it often eclipses everything else in a conversation. When Katy Perry, one of the world’s most successful pop stars, meets with the Pope, arguably the most important man in organised religion, the pictures hit the internet and the resultant press has nothing to do with tolerance or spiritual enlightenment. “I don’t want it to be a headline of the story, because it takes away from the purpose,” she says, chewing the cheese stuck on the spoon from her onion soup. “Also, it’s extremely misogynistic. Of course, I love my relationship, but that is one part of me, and I don’t want any part of what I do to be diminished.” (But, for the record, her and Orlando are good, thanks.)

The noise of being a public person is an issue Katy will wrestle with for the rest of her life. “There will always be noise,” she shrugs. But in the past year, Katy’s tight-knit crew of friends watched as she developed tools to control how it affects her. Last January, she attended a week-long program at the Hoffman Institute, a California-based personal growth retreat that, according to its website, “helps participants identify negative behaviours, moods and ways of thinking that developed unconsciously and were conditioned in childhood”.

Katy explains: “For years, my friends would go and come back completely rejuvenated, and I wanted to go, too. I was ready to let go of anything that was holding me back from being my ultimate self. I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart.” After a decade of back-to-back hit albums and record-breaking successes (she tied Michael Jackson for most number-one hits off a single record in 2011), her career hit a plateau with 2017’s Witness album. “Music is my first love and I think it was the universe saying: ‘Okay, you speak all of this language about self-love and authenticity, but we are going to put you through another test and take away any kind of validating “blankie”. Then we’ll see how much you do truly love yourself.’ That brokenness, plus me opening up to a greater, higher power and reconnecting with divinity, gave me a wholeness I never had. It gave me a new foundation. It’s not just a material foundation: it’s a soul foundation.”.

protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Superstar Katy Perry took time out of her world tour to chat with her good friend Derek Blasberg about love, life on the road and learning to better deal with fame. Here, read the full cover story from Vogue Australia’s August 2018 issue.

It’s exactly 3pm and I’m standing on the corner of Boulevard Saint-Germain and Rue Saint-Benoît in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. I’m wearing a cashmere long-sleeve polo shirt and I’m starting to sweat. Katy Perry, international pop star and my least punctual friend, is 30 minutes late for lunch at Café de Flore and I’m beginning to stress about making my flight back to New York later this evening. I knew this would happen. Last year, when I was Katy’s date to Vanity Fair’s Oscar party, I lied to her and said we needed to be there an hour before we actually needed to be, which meant we arrived only 15 minutes late. The year before that, I escorted her to the Met Gala, and when I arrived to pick her up at our appointed departure time she was still wearing a bathrobe, because she decided to bleach her eyebrows at the last minute.

At 3:10pm, I take out my phone. “Lady, I have a flight,” I text her, feeling the beads of sweat pool under my shirt and dribble down the small of my back.

“Remember when we said we’d meet at 2:30pm and I said I would be late?” she responds. “I never lie.” Dammit, she was right.

Lunch with Katy is always “spicy”, which is the term she just texted to describe my current mood. Beneath her big voice, Katy is a quick-witted pop-culture vulture and a fiery conversationalist. She has an ear for details and a comedic timing that reminds me of a young Lucille Ball. The last time I saw her for lunch in LA she showed up at the Beverly Hills Hotel wearing a baseball cap that said: “New Life: Who Dis?” Under normal circumstances – like when I don’t have a flight to catch and a job to do, which in this case is this interview – I’m happy to wait for her. (For one thing, it’s the ideal time to catch up on Instagram.) But she senses my panic here.

“Are you checking baggage, princess?” she texts. “Literal, not emotional.”

“Every time I fly my emotional baggage is overweight,” I respond.

“Tweet!” responds Katy, who is, incidentally, the number-one most-followed person on Twitter.

“Is this sabotage?” I ask.

“Nah, it’s deeper than that,” she texts. “I want to look my best with full hair and make-up, because I’m self-conscious.”

Having failed to convince me that I won’t miss tonight’s flight, I announce: “I’m starting the interview right now on text!”

“I thought you already did!”

I smile as I read the text and look up from my iPhone to see a silver van barrelling down Boulevard Saint-Germain, closely followed by aggressively driven motor scooters. The van screeches to a halt directly at my feet and out pops Katy wearing a satin spaghetti-strap jumpsuit, her bleached pixie frosted in lilac. The paparazzi hop off their scooters to chase her into the cafe with their cameras, but we’ve already tucked ourselves into comfy booth in a back corner. Like two American tourists, we order French onion soup and a croque madame. I look at my watch, see it’s 3:22pm, and tell her: “You better talk fast.”

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

I’ve worked in the starry swirl of the fashion industry for nearly two decades and in that time I’ve met my fair share of celebrities. But there’s a short list of a few people who transcend merely being famous – and the Pope is on the top of it. Last April, Katy travelled to Rome for an audience with the head of the Catholic Church and this is the first thing I want to talk about. “It started when we were on the Asia leg of the tour and I went to mass with my mom,” Katy tells me. “She hadn’t sung those songs in 40 years and watching her made me cry. It’s so beautiful and humbling to re-centre in a place where it’s not about anything else but reconnecting with the divine.”

As she sings in her 2010 hit with Snoop Dogg, Katy is a true California girl. She was born in picturesque Santa Barbara, and raised by Mary and Keith, two Pentecostal pastors. (Mary was raised Catholic.) Katy started performing as a young girl and left home at 15 to pursue a music career. “I was laser-focused and off to the races from the time I was nine years old,” she says. Unsurprisingly, her first megahit, 2008’s I Kissed a Girl, didn’t go platinum around the family dinner table. “My mom has prayed for me my entire life, hoping I’d come back to God. I never left Him, I was just a little bit secular, I was more materialistic and more career-driven. But now that I’m in my 30s, it’s more about spirituality and heart wholeness.”

Katy is an avid supporter of the David Lynch Foundation, which advocates for transcendental meditation education. Bob Roth, the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation, invited her to speak about her experience and the benefits of meditation at a health conference in Rome co-created by the Pontifical Council for Culture, which she readily accepted. “I’m such a big fan of Pope Francis. It’s a combination of compassion, humility, sternness and refusal. He is rebel – a rebel for Jesus.” Katy lists some papal facts, including that he named himself after Francis of Assisi, her favourite saint, and that he sticks to his vow of poverty despite the lavish surroundings of the Vatican. “He is bringing the Church back to humility and connecting with people. He’s very humble and not frivolous.” He’s also a lover of animals and is often depicted surrounded by wooded creatures, which reminds her of her favourite Disney character, Snow White.

When Katy met the Pope she brought two people with her: her mother and Orlando Bloom. Katy is protective of her love life – blame it on the painful dissolution of her marriage to Russell Brand in 2012, which was all caught on camera in Part of Me, the documentary that followed her California Dreams tour – so I tread into Orlando territory with extreme caution. “It’s okay to mention him,” she says with trepidation.

Here’s the problem: when the love lives of famous people are discussed, it often eclipses everything else in a conversation. When Katy Perry, one of the world’s most successful pop stars, meets with the Pope, arguably the most important man in organised religion, the pictures hit the internet and the resultant press has nothing to do with tolerance or spiritual enlightenment. “I don’t want it to be a headline of the story, because it takes away from the purpose,” she says, chewing the cheese stuck on the spoon from her onion soup. “Also, it’s extremely misogynistic. Of course, I love my relationship, but that is one part of me, and I don’t want any part of what I do to be diminished.” (But, for the record, her and Orlando are good, thanks.)

The noise of being a public person is an issue Katy will wrestle with for the rest of her life. “There will always be noise,” she shrugs. But in the past year, Katy’s tight-knit crew of friends watched as she developed tools to control how it affects her. Last January, she attended a week-long program at the Hoffman Institute, a California-based personal growth retreat that, according to its website, “helps participants identify negative behaviours, moods and ways of thinking that developed unconsciously and were conditioned in childhood”.

Katy explains: “For years, my friends would go and come back completely rejuvenated, and I wanted to go, too. I was ready to let go of anything that was holding me back from being my ultimate self. I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart.” After a decade of back-to-back hit albums and record-breaking successes (she tied Michael Jackson for most number-one hits off a single record in 2011), her career hit a plateau with 2017’s Witness album. “Music is my first love and I think it was the universe saying: ‘Okay, you speak all of this language about self-love and authenticity, but we are going to put you through another test and take away any kind of validating “blankie”. Then we’ll see how much you do truly love yourself.’ That brokenness, plus me opening up to a greater, higher power and reconnecting with divinity, gave me a wholeness I never had. It gave me a new foundation. It’s not just a material foundation: it’s a soul foundation.”

[“source=vogue”]

S P Apparels Standalone September 2018 Net Sales at Rs 177.61 crore, up 13.24% Y-o-Y

Reported Standalone quarterly numbers for S P Apparels are:Net Sales at Rs 177.61 crore in September 2018 up 13.24% from Rs. 156.84 crore in September 2017.

Quarterly Net Profit at Rs. 13.58 crore in September 2018 up 41.71% from Rs. 9.59 crore in September 2017.

EBITDA stands at Rs. 31.70 crore in September 2018 up 12.09% from Rs. 28.28 crore in September 2017.

S P Apparels EPS has increased to Rs. 5.29 in September 2018 from Rs. 3.81 in September 2017.

S P Apparels shares closed at 270.75 on November 14, 2018 (NSE) and has given -19.46% returns over the last 6 months and -29.45% over the last 12 months.

[“source=gsmarena”]

The cool and cult accessories line Kendall Jenner and Karl Lagerfeld are currently carrying around

Charlotte Stockdale and Katie Lyall’s very-2018 accessories have arrived in Australia, and they’re the perfect mix of humour and serious style nous.

Katie Lyall is excited about the newest piece she’s created with Charlotte Stockdale for their accessories label Chaos, if only she could find it. “Mine’s actually been stolen by Kendall Jenner, but Charlotte still managed to keep hers,” Lyall says over the phone from a balmy London summer evening. They’re talking about a gold-plated charm in the shape of a just-opened bottle cap that dangles elegantly from a zip chain that could be attached to keys or a phone. “It has saved our lives more times than it’s probably sensible to share,” says Lyall. “It’s to open up sparkling water,” intercedes Stockdale. You can practically hear the wink down the phone.

It’s this brand of irreverence that has marked their shared styling career, shared because, upon meeting in 1999, while Stockdale worked at British Vogue, they stuck side by side, working at Garage magazine and becoming Chaos Fashion, a creative consultancy. “I don’t know any styling duos,” considers Lyall. “It’s designer duos or photography duos, but no-one’s really decided to do it. There were some people who were a bit confused by it, but it didn’t really matter.”

That could be because their visual signature is so identifiable: pops of colour, mixed textures and fabrics with clever styling tweaks that seep into a subconscious then metamorphose suddenly into a need-it-now desire that has graced the pages of Vogue, i-D and their own magazine, Chaos 69. “You have a cotton shirt, and then you have a fashion skirt. It will be nice with a matt nylon trainer or matt crocodile boots,” Stockdale explains before surmising, “something shiny goes with something matt.”

Their Chaos label, coming to Australia for the first time when they land at David Jones this month, is a distillation of their visual handwriting. Phone cases in crayon brights were their starting point. “We were working a lot, and we didn’t want to put our phones down when we were doing fittings, styling clothes, whatever, and we would lose them,” recounts Stockdale. “We ended up tying ribbon to our Blackberrys at the time, and hanging them around our neck.” An early prototype was a zipper. “It was cheap and hokey, but kind of fun.” Requests from family and friends followed, which gave them the confidence to launch with a functional desirable product.

Design – jumbo cherries, letters and eight-balls in lush chenille embroidery that Lyall describes “delicious” – is balanced with functionality, hence the hand straps on the back of ‘hug’ cases, the supple deerskin perfected to wrap the corners and protect the phone. “They want to be able to hang their phone around their neck,” says Stockdale of customers. “They want to be able to find it in their bag, because they can see the zip, or catch their phone when they drop it.”

Likely you’ve noticed them already on Instagram. A lucky by-product of creating personalised phone cases, the campaigns basically shoot themselves, starring the selfies of the Hadid sisters, Marc Jacobs, Victoria Beckham, Edie Campbell, Adwoa Aboah and Karl Lagerfeld. They’ve worked with Lagerfeld, a long-time collaborator and mentor, alongside Silvia Venturini Fendi, consulting for 10 years at Fendi, and both have informed their appreciation for technical knowledge and luxurious finishes – the zips are now silver- or gold-plated.

“When you work with people like Silvia and Karl, you have to really not be listening to not come away with quite a lot of knowledge,” Stockdale says. “They haven’t grown scared. They are willing to fail, which is the biggest thing; they’re fearless.”

Working as a duo has been another propellant. “In times when you’re doubting what you are doing, the other person says: ‘No, don’t worry, it’s all on the right track,’” says Stockdale. “It’s like being on an airplane and there’s turbulence and you’re scared, but if there’s someone who is more scared than you, somehow that makes you less scared.” Lyall adds: “It allows you to have more freedom and control at the same time.”

They’ve added charms, lanyards, luggage tags and the occasional piece of ready-to-wear while they focus more and more on personalisation, a trend they’re predicting will get ever stronger. “Why would you not, if you can have something, just for you?” says Lyall. Perhaps a monogram on that bottle opener then, in case another Jenner should chance upon it.

[“source=cnbc”]

Every Dazzling December Fashion Launch We’re Shopping This Month

We’ve arrived at our fave style season. Winter offers cozy clothing and accessories complete with all the shearling-lined shoes, sparkly holiday dresses, and dazzling accessories a girl could ask for. Ahead you’ll find our top December 2018 fashion launches from Toms, M.Gemi, La Ligne, and so many more, specifically designed for fireplace lounging and hot cocoa sipping.

[“source=forbes]

12 of the best new hair accessories

best party hair accessories

Logo hair slides are back and this time they’re oh-so-glam. We’ll wear this Gucci number as jewellery. the best new party hair accessories

Velvet, bows, pearls… this accessory ticks off three trends in one. the best new party hair accessories

Anthropologie does excellent affordable hair accessories, such as this chic headband.

[“source=gsmarena”]

Great cheap accessories for all the stuff you bought on Black Friday

Quick note: If you live in SE Michigan, come check me out tonight at the Livonia Public Library at 7 p.m. Learn my favorite money-saving secrets and enjoy a good chance at winning some raffle prizes!

I’ll admit it — I’m glad Black Friday and Cyber Monday are in the rear view. Because although there were some colossal deals this year, it’s exhausting to sort, track and share them all!

That said, you cannot imagine the Herculean efforts of countless CNET writers and editors, who’ve been doing all that sorting, tracking and sharing for weeks. To say this was a team effort is an understatement. I was a tiny cog in the much greater Black Friday machine, and my fellow deal finders deserve a ton of credit. (And a beer — next round’s on me!)

Before we dive into today’s deals, which are all about improving the products you might have scored during the past few days, let me pause to talk about charity. Today is Giving Tuesday, and even if your wallet is empty, you can support worthy causes without spending a dime. Please consider helping those less fortunate. It’s much quicker and easier than you think.

On to business. Did you score an awesome new toy during the sale madness of the past couple weeks? Let’s talk about some accessories you might want to add — and some surprisingly cheap ones at that.

speck-stay-clear-iphone-xr
Don’t overpay for a phone case; anything over $10-15 is probably too much.

Sarah Tew/CNET

It doesn’t matter if you spent $200 or $1,200 — the first order of business is a case. Because, let’s face it, gravity happens. Here’s what you shouldn’t do: Buy an expensive case from Apple, AT&T, Verizon or some other retailer. You may have bought your phone there, but cases are best sourced elsewhere.

My advice: Hit up Amazon and Ebay. Just search for cases for your phone model and you’ll find a dizzying array of choices. Hard cases, soft cases, clear ones, colored ones and so on. Even better, you’ll find lots of them priced around $10-15 — much better than the $30-50 you’re likely to pay in store.

Read more: iPhone XR cases: 4 cheap alternatives to Apple’s $40 one

Of course, putting your phone in a case doesn’t guarantee 100-percent protection against pavement encounters. The best protection is not dropping your phone in the first place, which is why I continue to champion Phone Straps (formerly Ninja Loops).

See it at Phone Loops

A mere $5 buys you a stylish strap that attaches to just about any phone case. Once you get accustomed to sliding your fingers underneath it, you’ll find it much easier to grip your phone — and you’ll be much less likely to drop it.

This remains one of my all-time favorite products. It makes a great gift, too, which is why you should buy at least three (which bags you free shipping).

You bought a Nintendo Switch

Switch deals were everywhere this year — and often quite fleeting. Now that you have the console, though, you might want to consider a couple accessories — starting with a mobile charger.

The Switch relies on a USB-C input, though you don’t necessarily need a power bank that has a USB-C output. Those tend to cost a bit more, though they have the advantage of recharging your console more quickly than a standard 5V USB-A port.

[“source=forbes]

Getting end-consumers of our apparels to care about ethical sourcing

The readymade garment (RMG) sector of Bangladesh has made universally applauded advances in the fields of ethical and sustainable manufacturing practices, with huge investments being made in the sector to improve working conditions and environmental standards. But, are the vast improvements that have been made being fully appreciated by the end-consumers and are those consumers willing to pay for ethically produced fashion products?

Following the tragic events of the Rana Plaza disaster, there has quite rightly been huge international focus on the compliance and ethical credentials of manufacturers working in the nation’s apparel sector, with the Bangladesh RMG industry now subject to scrutiny regarding all aspects of health and safety in the workplace as well as guaranteeing that ethical and environmental standards are maintained. Initiatives that were implemented since that fateful day have ensured that all standards within the Bangladesh RMG sector have greatly improved and the country now has some of the highest rated LEED factories in the world, manufacturing product that meets global ethical and social compliance standards.

Are these endeavours to improve our industry being acknowledged, not just by the buyers and brands that purchase our products, but by their customers, the end consumer? Evidence suggests that consumers are becoming more aware of their environmental impact and strive to lead a more sustainable and environmentally aware lifestyle—but who are these consumers and are they willing to pay more for ethically sourced apparel?

There are growing numbers of consumers in Europe and the US (the RMG sectors key export markets) who consciously strive to reduce their carbon footprint by supporting sustainable agriculture and ethical fashion brands, buying organic products and choosing alternative transport rather than driving their own cars. These consumers are concerned about the rights of workers and their safety, living wages and health and the social and environmental impacts of the product they purchase. What is changing this attitude is the viewpoint of the millennial generation (those consumers in their 20’s-early 30’s who are more aware than their parents of the benefits of ethically and sustainably sourced products and, when surveyed are more willing to pay for them.

Retailers and brands have to provide what their consumers want, but what is increasingly more important is that they also educate their consumer regarding the ethical and sustainable business that they are developing. A survey conducted by the Fairtrade Foundation found that ’82 percent of UK teenagers think companies need to act more responsibly, while just 45 percent said they trust businesses to do so’. Obviously more work is required by our trading partners to communicate all the ethical and sustainable initiatives that have been invested in by the RMG business in Bangladesh to these millennial consumers who, in the large part constitute their target audience.

In the past, the thought of who produced your garments and under what conditions never crossed the consumer’s mind and was merely a secondary concern after price and style. Things are very different today, and the millennial generation has a lot to do with it. They’ve grown up understanding the current state of our environment and desperate need for sustainable and ethically sourced products and are more willing to pay for it than former generations.

A survey conducted on 1,000 UK customers and their views on leading clothing retailers by Morgan Stanley Research found that even though price and quality concerns continue to rank the highest, ethical concerns have gained importance, specifically with the younger consumer demographic. Fifty-one percent of respondents stated that ethical credentials of apparel retailers are somewhat important to very important while only 13 percent stated that they are somewhat unimportant to not important at all. The survey also found that younger consumers are more concerned about ethics when shopping as 58 percent of 16-24 year olds stated that ethical credentials are very or somewhat important while 49 percent of people aged 55 or older viewed ethical credentials as somewhat unimportant or not important at all. One can see that this number rises with age.

However, Steve Polski, the senior director of supply chains and sustainability at Cargill, a US company specialising in bringing sustainable foodstuffs to consumers, has found that “even though consumers demand sustainable products and services, they are often unwilling to pay a premium for them”. He also states that it is clear that consumers care about brand’s sustainability efforts, but they generally won’t pay more for the products and would instead reward the brand with customer loyalty. This suggests to me that the onus weighs heavily on the brand—through their efforts to source more ethical, sustainable product they can be rewarded with greater customer loyalty, thus increasing sales, whilst at the same time applying pricing pressure on the manufacturers so that the costs inherent with these ethical, sustainable practices is borne at source. Should the brands not consider that, to achieve a truly sustainable, ethical sourcing process they share the burden of the cost implications, possibly even absorbing some of the costs as part of their marketing budgets—after all, increased brand loyalty is what the majority of brands and retailers aspire to with the advertising that they pay for annually?

In another example, co-author of, “The Myth of the Ethical Consumer,” Professor Timothy Devinney argues that there is a belief that our purchasing behaviour is driven by our values, but that in reality, factors such as price, quality and value override our core values in the end. He goes as far as saying that conscience-driven shopping does not exist and that there is a disconnect between the values people express and the actual buying of ethical products in the market.

There is also the simple issue of economics that must not be ignored. A vast customer base exists both in Europe and the US who, quite simply, cannot afford to put ethical concerns to the forefront of their purchasing decisions. For those on limited household income, the priority when making a purchase is price, with quality a close second and ethical sourcing far lower down the scale of concern. It is not that this sector of society does not care it is, simply, that they cannot afford to! Thus, it is the premise of the lower middle class and above sectors of society that appreciate and support ethical product who should be encouraged to change their buying habits sooner.

Changing the buying habits of the end-consumer is a duty that needs to be embraced by the brands and retailers that Bangladesh trades with. It should be their responsibility to communicate with their customers and detail the steps that they are taking to produce ethically sourced product and, where necessary, detailing the impact that this has on goods in-store.

[“source=forbes]