Loved BY FAR The Accessories Label To Lust After

Established by twinnies Valentina and Sabina, along with their bestie Denitsa, BY FAR is the footwear and accessories label that has rocketed in the success-o-sphere in only two years.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

Contemporary and cool, with a hint of the nostalgic courtesy of the square toe shoes a la Rachel from Friends and croc embossed baguette bags. You’ll want them all, as do the celebs and there’s tons of them from Kylie Jenner to Michelle Obama and all the girlies in between.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What’s in the name you’re asking? Well it derives from the names of the founders’ three little boys, who are, naturally, by far their greatest source of pride. Today, the girls split their time between Australia and Europe.

BY FAR designersBY FAR

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What was your first fashion memory? Our generation was the odd one that was raised between the fall of the Communism and the rise of the Internet. Our admiration for fashion was what we saw our mothers wearing, since choice was scarcest each of them were creating their own garments with the resources they could find or buying from the International store with the little dollars they could get. Most of the kids were wearing the same cloths, those dark brown chinos and wool coats; the same goes to our toys, they were made of wood and rubber, very rarely one could see pop-up colors such as pinks and purples. At that time, we didn’t consider ourselves cool and we wanted to have those girly toys and cloths. Now we have great appreciation for our childhood memories, because it was very unique and different. Indeed, all those textures and pallets are considered the epitome of minimalism and chicness, it has driven our perception for style. After the fall of the communism in 1989 came the golden era of the 90s elegance, where we first felt the freedom for more choice and expression of style. We still admire icons such as Carolyn Kennedy, Winona Ryder and Sofia Coppola. Therefore, that decade continues to be the source for inspiration for us.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

How did you get in the industry and how did your label come about? We believe it was all destined. Denitsa’s husband (Vasil) always pushed the idea of creating our own brand, but we didn’t believe we were qualified enough. Randomly he was commissioned to optimise one shoe factory with solar panels. So he came back from the meeting and said to Denitsa “I found the people that will produce your shoes”, obviously she said “You’re completely crazy”. Nevertheless, we decided to meet them and since then we’re working in great harmony together.

What’s the BY FAR signature style? Definitely boots such as SOFIA and BECCA, now more and more people recognize us for barely-there sandals such as TANYA.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What does each of you bring to the label? Denitca is the designer, Sabina is the CEO and I’m overlooking the whole brand image of BY FAR.

Where do you see your brand going? Sky is the limit to us! We have so many ideas and projects up our sleeves, we’re just waiting for the right moment to pursue them.

[“source=forbes]

Loved BY FAR The Accessories Label To Lust After

Established by twinnies Valentina and Sabina, along with their bestie Denitsa, BY FAR is the footwear and accessories label that has rocketed in the success-o-sphere in only two years.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

Contemporary and cool, with a hint of the nostalgic courtesy of the square toe shoes a la Rachel from Friends and croc embossed baguette bags. You’ll want them all, as do the celebs and there’s tons of them from Kylie Jenner to Michelle Obama and all the girlies in between.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

What’s in the name you’re asking? Well it derives from the names of the founders’ three little boys, who are, naturally, by far their greatest source of pride. Today, the girls split their time between Australia and Europe.

BY FAR designersBY FAR

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

What was your first fashion memory? Our generation was the odd one that was raised between the fall of the Communism and the rise of the Internet. Our admiration for fashion was what we saw our mothers wearing, since choice was scarcest each of them were creating their own garments with the resources they could find or buying from the International store with the little dollars they could get. Most of the kids were wearing the same cloths, those dark brown chinos and wool coats; the same goes to our toys, they were made of wood and rubber, very rarely one could see pop-up colors such as pinks and purples. At that time, we didn’t consider ourselves cool and we wanted to have those girly toys and cloths. Now we have great appreciation for our childhood memories, because it was very unique and different. Indeed, all those textures and pallets are considered the epitome of minimalism and chicness, it has driven our perception for style. After the fall of the communism in 1989 came the golden era of the 90s elegance, where we first felt the freedom for more choice and expression of style. We still admire icons such as Carolyn Kennedy, Winona Ryder and Sofia Coppola. Therefore, that decade continues to be the source for inspiration for us.

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

BY FAR campaignBY FAR

How did you get in the industry and how did your label come about? We believe it was all destined. Denitsa’s husband (Vasil) always pushed the idea of creating our own brand, but we didn’t believe we were qualified enough. Randomly he was commissioned to optimise one shoe factory with solar panels. So he came back from the meeting and said to Denitsa “I found the people that will produce your shoes”, obviously she said “You’re completely crazy”. Nevertheless, we decided to meet them and since then we’re working in great harmony together.

[“source=forbes]

Katy Perry on her career, meeting the Pope and protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Superstar Katy Perry took time out of her world tour to chat with her good friend Derek Blasberg about love, life on the road and learning to better deal with fame. Here, read the full cover story from Vogue Australia’s August 2018 issue.

It’s exactly 3pm and I’m standing on the corner of Boulevard Saint-Germain and Rue Saint-Benoît in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. I’m wearing a cashmere long-sleeve polo shirt and I’m starting to sweat. Katy Perry, international pop star and my least punctual friend, is 30 minutes late for lunch at Café de Flore and I’m beginning to stress about making my flight back to New York later this evening. I knew this would happen. Last year, when I was Katy’s date to Vanity Fair’s Oscar party, I lied to her and said we needed to be there an hour before we actually needed to be, which meant we arrived only 15 minutes late. The year before that, I escorted her to the Met Gala, and when I arrived to pick her up at our appointed departure time she was still wearing a bathrobe, because she decided to bleach her eyebrows at the last minute.

At 3:10pm, I take out my phone. “Lady, I have a flight,” I text her, feeling the beads of sweat pool under my shirt and dribble down the small of my back.

“Remember when we said we’d meet at 2:30pm and I said I would be late?” she responds. “I never lie.” Dammit, she was right.

Lunch with Katy is always “spicy”, which is the term she just texted to describe my current mood. Beneath her big voice, Katy is a quick-witted pop-culture vulture and a fiery conversationalist. She has an ear for details and a comedic timing that reminds me of a young Lucille Ball. The last time I saw her for lunch in LA she showed up at the Beverly Hills Hotel wearing a baseball cap that said: “New Life: Who Dis?” Under normal circumstances – like when I don’t have a flight to catch and a job to do, which in this case is this interview – I’m happy to wait for her. (For one thing, it’s the ideal time to catch up on Instagram.) But she senses my panic here.

“Are you checking baggage, princess?” she texts. “Literal, not emotional.”

“Every time I fly my emotional baggage is overweight,” I respond.

“Tweet!” responds Katy, who is, incidentally, the number-one most-followed person on Twitter.

“Is this sabotage?” I ask.

“Nah, it’s deeper than that,” she texts. “I want to look my best with full hair and make-up, because I’m self-conscious.”

Having failed to convince me that I won’t miss tonight’s flight, I announce: “I’m starting the interview right now on text!”

“I thought you already did!”

I smile as I read the text and look up from my iPhone to see a silver van barrelling down Boulevard Saint-Germain, closely followed by aggressively driven motor scooters. The van screeches to a halt directly at my feet and out pops Katy wearing a satin spaghetti-strap jumpsuit, her bleached pixie frosted in lilac. The paparazzi hop off their scooters to chase her into the cafe with their cameras, but we’ve already tucked ourselves into comfy booth in a back corner. Like two American tourists, we order French onion soup and a croque madame. I look at my watch, see it’s 3:22pm, and tell her: “You better talk fast.”

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

I’ve worked in the starry swirl of the fashion industry for nearly two decades and in that time I’ve met my fair share of celebrities. But there’s a short list of a few people who transcend merely being famous – and the Pope is on the top of it. Last April, Katy travelled to Rome for an audience with the head of the Catholic Church and this is the first thing I want to talk about. “It started when we were on the Asia leg of the tour and I went to mass with my mom,” Katy tells me. “She hadn’t sung those songs in 40 years and watching her made me cry. It’s so beautiful and humbling to re-centre in a place where it’s not about anything else but reconnecting with the divine.”

As she sings in her 2010 hit with Snoop Dogg, Katy is a true California girl. She was born in picturesque Santa Barbara, and raised by Mary and Keith, two Pentecostal pastors. (Mary was raised Catholic.) Katy started performing as a young girl and left home at 15 to pursue a music career. “I was laser-focused and off to the races from the time I was nine years old,” she says. Unsurprisingly, her first megahit, 2008’s I Kissed a Girl, didn’t go platinum around the family dinner table. “My mom has prayed for me my entire life, hoping I’d come back to God. I never left Him, I was just a little bit secular, I was more materialistic and more career-driven. But now that I’m in my 30s, it’s more about spirituality and heart wholeness.”

Katy is an avid supporter of the David Lynch Foundation, which advocates for transcendental meditation education. Bob Roth, the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation, invited her to speak about her experience and the benefits of meditation at a health conference in Rome co-created by the Pontifical Council for Culture, which she readily accepted. “I’m such a big fan of Pope Francis. It’s a combination of compassion, humility, sternness and refusal. He is rebel – a rebel for Jesus.” Katy lists some papal facts, including that he named himself after Francis of Assisi, her favourite saint, and that he sticks to his vow of poverty despite the lavish surroundings of the Vatican. “He is bringing the Church back to humility and connecting with people. He’s very humble and not frivolous.” He’s also a lover of animals and is often depicted surrounded by wooded creatures, which reminds her of her favourite Disney character, Snow White.

When Katy met the Pope she brought two people with her: her mother and Orlando Bloom. Katy is protective of her love life – blame it on the painful dissolution of her marriage to Russell Brand in 2012, which was all caught on camera in Part of Me, the documentary that followed her California Dreams tour – so I tread into Orlando territory with extreme caution. “It’s okay to mention him,” she says with trepidation.

Here’s the problem: when the love lives of famous people are discussed, it often eclipses everything else in a conversation. When Katy Perry, one of the world’s most successful pop stars, meets with the Pope, arguably the most important man in organised religion, the pictures hit the internet and the resultant press has nothing to do with tolerance or spiritual enlightenment. “I don’t want it to be a headline of the story, because it takes away from the purpose,” she says, chewing the cheese stuck on the spoon from her onion soup. “Also, it’s extremely misogynistic. Of course, I love my relationship, but that is one part of me, and I don’t want any part of what I do to be diminished.” (But, for the record, her and Orlando are good, thanks.)

The noise of being a public person is an issue Katy will wrestle with for the rest of her life. “There will always be noise,” she shrugs. But in the past year, Katy’s tight-knit crew of friends watched as she developed tools to control how it affects her. Last January, she attended a week-long program at the Hoffman Institute, a California-based personal growth retreat that, according to its website, “helps participants identify negative behaviours, moods and ways of thinking that developed unconsciously and were conditioned in childhood”.

Katy explains: “For years, my friends would go and come back completely rejuvenated, and I wanted to go, too. I was ready to let go of anything that was holding me back from being my ultimate self. I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart.” After a decade of back-to-back hit albums and record-breaking successes (she tied Michael Jackson for most number-one hits off a single record in 2011), her career hit a plateau with 2017’s Witness album. “Music is my first love and I think it was the universe saying: ‘Okay, you speak all of this language about self-love and authenticity, but we are going to put you through another test and take away any kind of validating “blankie”. Then we’ll see how much you do truly love yourself.’ That brokenness, plus me opening up to a greater, higher power and reconnecting with divinity, gave me a wholeness I never had. It gave me a new foundation. It’s not just a material foundation: it’s a soul foundation.”.

protecting her relationship with Orlando Bloom

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Superstar Katy Perry took time out of her world tour to chat with her good friend Derek Blasberg about love, life on the road and learning to better deal with fame. Here, read the full cover story from Vogue Australia’s August 2018 issue.

It’s exactly 3pm and I’m standing on the corner of Boulevard Saint-Germain and Rue Saint-Benoît in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. I’m wearing a cashmere long-sleeve polo shirt and I’m starting to sweat. Katy Perry, international pop star and my least punctual friend, is 30 minutes late for lunch at Café de Flore and I’m beginning to stress about making my flight back to New York later this evening. I knew this would happen. Last year, when I was Katy’s date to Vanity Fair’s Oscar party, I lied to her and said we needed to be there an hour before we actually needed to be, which meant we arrived only 15 minutes late. The year before that, I escorted her to the Met Gala, and when I arrived to pick her up at our appointed departure time she was still wearing a bathrobe, because she decided to bleach her eyebrows at the last minute.

At 3:10pm, I take out my phone. “Lady, I have a flight,” I text her, feeling the beads of sweat pool under my shirt and dribble down the small of my back.

“Remember when we said we’d meet at 2:30pm and I said I would be late?” she responds. “I never lie.” Dammit, she was right.

Lunch with Katy is always “spicy”, which is the term she just texted to describe my current mood. Beneath her big voice, Katy is a quick-witted pop-culture vulture and a fiery conversationalist. She has an ear for details and a comedic timing that reminds me of a young Lucille Ball. The last time I saw her for lunch in LA she showed up at the Beverly Hills Hotel wearing a baseball cap that said: “New Life: Who Dis?” Under normal circumstances – like when I don’t have a flight to catch and a job to do, which in this case is this interview – I’m happy to wait for her. (For one thing, it’s the ideal time to catch up on Instagram.) But she senses my panic here.

“Are you checking baggage, princess?” she texts. “Literal, not emotional.”

“Every time I fly my emotional baggage is overweight,” I respond.

“Tweet!” responds Katy, who is, incidentally, the number-one most-followed person on Twitter.

“Is this sabotage?” I ask.

“Nah, it’s deeper than that,” she texts. “I want to look my best with full hair and make-up, because I’m self-conscious.”

Having failed to convince me that I won’t miss tonight’s flight, I announce: “I’m starting the interview right now on text!”

“I thought you already did!”

I smile as I read the text and look up from my iPhone to see a silver van barrelling down Boulevard Saint-Germain, closely followed by aggressively driven motor scooters. The van screeches to a halt directly at my feet and out pops Katy wearing a satin spaghetti-strap jumpsuit, her bleached pixie frosted in lilac. The paparazzi hop off their scooters to chase her into the cafe with their cameras, but we’ve already tucked ourselves into comfy booth in a back corner. Like two American tourists, we order French onion soup and a croque madame. I look at my watch, see it’s 3:22pm, and tell her: “You better talk fast.”

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

Photographed by Emma Summerton, styled by Christine Centenera, Vogue Australia, August 2018.

I’ve worked in the starry swirl of the fashion industry for nearly two decades and in that time I’ve met my fair share of celebrities. But there’s a short list of a few people who transcend merely being famous – and the Pope is on the top of it. Last April, Katy travelled to Rome for an audience with the head of the Catholic Church and this is the first thing I want to talk about. “It started when we were on the Asia leg of the tour and I went to mass with my mom,” Katy tells me. “She hadn’t sung those songs in 40 years and watching her made me cry. It’s so beautiful and humbling to re-centre in a place where it’s not about anything else but reconnecting with the divine.”

As she sings in her 2010 hit with Snoop Dogg, Katy is a true California girl. She was born in picturesque Santa Barbara, and raised by Mary and Keith, two Pentecostal pastors. (Mary was raised Catholic.) Katy started performing as a young girl and left home at 15 to pursue a music career. “I was laser-focused and off to the races from the time I was nine years old,” she says. Unsurprisingly, her first megahit, 2008’s I Kissed a Girl, didn’t go platinum around the family dinner table. “My mom has prayed for me my entire life, hoping I’d come back to God. I never left Him, I was just a little bit secular, I was more materialistic and more career-driven. But now that I’m in my 30s, it’s more about spirituality and heart wholeness.”

Katy is an avid supporter of the David Lynch Foundation, which advocates for transcendental meditation education. Bob Roth, the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation, invited her to speak about her experience and the benefits of meditation at a health conference in Rome co-created by the Pontifical Council for Culture, which she readily accepted. “I’m such a big fan of Pope Francis. It’s a combination of compassion, humility, sternness and refusal. He is rebel – a rebel for Jesus.” Katy lists some papal facts, including that he named himself after Francis of Assisi, her favourite saint, and that he sticks to his vow of poverty despite the lavish surroundings of the Vatican. “He is bringing the Church back to humility and connecting with people. He’s very humble and not frivolous.” He’s also a lover of animals and is often depicted surrounded by wooded creatures, which reminds her of her favourite Disney character, Snow White.

When Katy met the Pope she brought two people with her: her mother and Orlando Bloom. Katy is protective of her love life – blame it on the painful dissolution of her marriage to Russell Brand in 2012, which was all caught on camera in Part of Me, the documentary that followed her California Dreams tour – so I tread into Orlando territory with extreme caution. “It’s okay to mention him,” she says with trepidation.

Here’s the problem: when the love lives of famous people are discussed, it often eclipses everything else in a conversation. When Katy Perry, one of the world’s most successful pop stars, meets with the Pope, arguably the most important man in organised religion, the pictures hit the internet and the resultant press has nothing to do with tolerance or spiritual enlightenment. “I don’t want it to be a headline of the story, because it takes away from the purpose,” she says, chewing the cheese stuck on the spoon from her onion soup. “Also, it’s extremely misogynistic. Of course, I love my relationship, but that is one part of me, and I don’t want any part of what I do to be diminished.” (But, for the record, her and Orlando are good, thanks.)

The noise of being a public person is an issue Katy will wrestle with for the rest of her life. “There will always be noise,” she shrugs. But in the past year, Katy’s tight-knit crew of friends watched as she developed tools to control how it affects her. Last January, she attended a week-long program at the Hoffman Institute, a California-based personal growth retreat that, according to its website, “helps participants identify negative behaviours, moods and ways of thinking that developed unconsciously and were conditioned in childhood”.

Katy explains: “For years, my friends would go and come back completely rejuvenated, and I wanted to go, too. I was ready to let go of anything that was holding me back from being my ultimate self. I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart.” After a decade of back-to-back hit albums and record-breaking successes (she tied Michael Jackson for most number-one hits off a single record in 2011), her career hit a plateau with 2017’s Witness album. “Music is my first love and I think it was the universe saying: ‘Okay, you speak all of this language about self-love and authenticity, but we are going to put you through another test and take away any kind of validating “blankie”. Then we’ll see how much you do truly love yourself.’ That brokenness, plus me opening up to a greater, higher power and reconnecting with divinity, gave me a wholeness I never had. It gave me a new foundation. It’s not just a material foundation: it’s a soul foundation.”

[“source=vogue”]

The cool and cult accessories line Kendall Jenner and Karl Lagerfeld are currently carrying around

Charlotte Stockdale and Katie Lyall’s very-2018 accessories have arrived in Australia, and they’re the perfect mix of humour and serious style nous.

Katie Lyall is excited about the newest piece she’s created with Charlotte Stockdale for their accessories label Chaos, if only she could find it. “Mine’s actually been stolen by Kendall Jenner, but Charlotte still managed to keep hers,” Lyall says over the phone from a balmy London summer evening. They’re talking about a gold-plated charm in the shape of a just-opened bottle cap that dangles elegantly from a zip chain that could be attached to keys or a phone. “It has saved our lives more times than it’s probably sensible to share,” says Lyall. “It’s to open up sparkling water,” intercedes Stockdale. You can practically hear the wink down the phone.

It’s this brand of irreverence that has marked their shared styling career, shared because, upon meeting in 1999, while Stockdale worked at British Vogue, they stuck side by side, working at Garage magazine and becoming Chaos Fashion, a creative consultancy. “I don’t know any styling duos,” considers Lyall. “It’s designer duos or photography duos, but no-one’s really decided to do it. There were some people who were a bit confused by it, but it didn’t really matter.”

That could be because their visual signature is so identifiable: pops of colour, mixed textures and fabrics with clever styling tweaks that seep into a subconscious then metamorphose suddenly into a need-it-now desire that has graced the pages of Vogue, i-D and their own magazine, Chaos 69. “You have a cotton shirt, and then you have a fashion skirt. It will be nice with a matt nylon trainer or matt crocodile boots,” Stockdale explains before surmising, “something shiny goes with something matt.”

Their Chaos label, coming to Australia for the first time when they land at David Jones this month, is a distillation of their visual handwriting. Phone cases in crayon brights were their starting point. “We were working a lot, and we didn’t want to put our phones down when we were doing fittings, styling clothes, whatever, and we would lose them,” recounts Stockdale. “We ended up tying ribbon to our Blackberrys at the time, and hanging them around our neck.” An early prototype was a zipper. “It was cheap and hokey, but kind of fun.” Requests from family and friends followed, which gave them the confidence to launch with a functional desirable product.

Design – jumbo cherries, letters and eight-balls in lush chenille embroidery that Lyall describes “delicious” – is balanced with functionality, hence the hand straps on the back of ‘hug’ cases, the supple deerskin perfected to wrap the corners and protect the phone. “They want to be able to hang their phone around their neck,” says Stockdale of customers. “They want to be able to find it in their bag, because they can see the zip, or catch their phone when they drop it.”

Likely you’ve noticed them already on Instagram. A lucky by-product of creating personalised phone cases, the campaigns basically shoot themselves, starring the selfies of the Hadid sisters, Marc Jacobs, Victoria Beckham, Edie Campbell, Adwoa Aboah and Karl Lagerfeld. They’ve worked with Lagerfeld, a long-time collaborator and mentor, alongside Silvia Venturini Fendi, consulting for 10 years at Fendi, and both have informed their appreciation for technical knowledge and luxurious finishes – the zips are now silver- or gold-plated.

“When you work with people like Silvia and Karl, you have to really not be listening to not come away with quite a lot of knowledge,” Stockdale says. “They haven’t grown scared. They are willing to fail, which is the biggest thing; they’re fearless.”

Working as a duo has been another propellant. “In times when you’re doubting what you are doing, the other person says: ‘No, don’t worry, it’s all on the right track,’” says Stockdale. “It’s like being on an airplane and there’s turbulence and you’re scared, but if there’s someone who is more scared than you, somehow that makes you less scared.” Lyall adds: “It allows you to have more freedom and control at the same time.”

They’ve added charms, lanyards, luggage tags and the occasional piece of ready-to-wear while they focus more and more on personalisation, a trend they’re predicting will get ever stronger. “Why would you not, if you can have something, just for you?” says Lyall. Perhaps a monogram on that bottle opener then, in case another Jenner should chance upon it.

[“source=cnbc”]

12 of the best new hair accessories

best party hair accessories

Logo hair slides are back and this time they’re oh-so-glam. We’ll wear this Gucci number as jewellery. the best new party hair accessories

Velvet, bows, pearls… this accessory ticks off three trends in one. the best new party hair accessories

Anthropologie does excellent affordable hair accessories, such as this chic headband.

[“source=gsmarena”]

Great cheap accessories for all the stuff you bought on Black Friday

Quick note: If you live in SE Michigan, come check me out tonight at the Livonia Public Library at 7 p.m. Learn my favorite money-saving secrets and enjoy a good chance at winning some raffle prizes!

I’ll admit it — I’m glad Black Friday and Cyber Monday are in the rear view. Because although there were some colossal deals this year, it’s exhausting to sort, track and share them all!

That said, you cannot imagine the Herculean efforts of countless CNET writers and editors, who’ve been doing all that sorting, tracking and sharing for weeks. To say this was a team effort is an understatement. I was a tiny cog in the much greater Black Friday machine, and my fellow deal finders deserve a ton of credit. (And a beer — next round’s on me!)

Before we dive into today’s deals, which are all about improving the products you might have scored during the past few days, let me pause to talk about charity. Today is Giving Tuesday, and even if your wallet is empty, you can support worthy causes without spending a dime. Please consider helping those less fortunate. It’s much quicker and easier than you think.

On to business. Did you score an awesome new toy during the sale madness of the past couple weeks? Let’s talk about some accessories you might want to add — and some surprisingly cheap ones at that.

speck-stay-clear-iphone-xr
Don’t overpay for a phone case; anything over $10-15 is probably too much.

Sarah Tew/CNET

It doesn’t matter if you spent $200 or $1,200 — the first order of business is a case. Because, let’s face it, gravity happens. Here’s what you shouldn’t do: Buy an expensive case from Apple, AT&T, Verizon or some other retailer. You may have bought your phone there, but cases are best sourced elsewhere.

My advice: Hit up Amazon and Ebay. Just search for cases for your phone model and you’ll find a dizzying array of choices. Hard cases, soft cases, clear ones, colored ones and so on. Even better, you’ll find lots of them priced around $10-15 — much better than the $30-50 you’re likely to pay in store.

Read more: iPhone XR cases: 4 cheap alternatives to Apple’s $40 one

Of course, putting your phone in a case doesn’t guarantee 100-percent protection against pavement encounters. The best protection is not dropping your phone in the first place, which is why I continue to champion Phone Straps (formerly Ninja Loops).

See it at Phone Loops

A mere $5 buys you a stylish strap that attaches to just about any phone case. Once you get accustomed to sliding your fingers underneath it, you’ll find it much easier to grip your phone — and you’ll be much less likely to drop it.

This remains one of my all-time favorite products. It makes a great gift, too, which is why you should buy at least three (which bags you free shipping).

You bought a Nintendo Switch

Switch deals were everywhere this year — and often quite fleeting. Now that you have the console, though, you might want to consider a couple accessories — starting with a mobile charger.

The Switch relies on a USB-C input, though you don’t necessarily need a power bank that has a USB-C output. Those tend to cost a bit more, though they have the advantage of recharging your console more quickly than a standard 5V USB-A port.

[“source=forbes]

Susan Szatmáry Rolls Into the Accessories Market With a Wheeled “Valisette” Bag Packed With Wow Factor

Image result for Susan Szatmáry Rolls Into the Accessories Market With a Wheeled “Valisette” Bag Packed With Wow Factor

When Susan Szatmáry (née Ibrahim) decided to launch her own collection, she had a wealth of experiences and cultures to draw upon. Born in Baghdad, from 13, the multilingual designer was raised in Stockholm and has subsequently lived in Italy and in Paris, where, for Spring 2019, she presented her first collection of travel-friendly bags to the press. Although she christened the different styles with French names like Palais Royal (a roomy flapped shoulder bag) and Pont Neuf (a tote designed to fit perfectly atop a suitcase), it was in an airport in Italy that the designer stumbled upon the inspiration for the line’s clever little bag, the Valisette. While watching streams of people maneuver their rollers around the travel hub, it occurred to Szatmáry that her compact, structured box bag would look like “a mini, mini, mini valise” with the addition of wheels, and so the Valisette, big enough to fit an iPhone and keys, and with a hook that allows it to be hung from the wrist, came into being.

Part of the appeal of the Valisette is the unexpected yoking of elegance and an industrial touch. Szatmáry explains that she’s on a mission to “break” luxury and thus modernize it. “Always when I went to interviews at all these companies [they asked], ‘What is your style? What is your style?’ Now [I can say] these bags, they are really me.” Szatmáry’s highly structured Spring collection was inspired by the Deco period. “I just love the charm of [Deco],” the designer says. “There is something pure about it and strong.” It appeals to the designer on a personal level, as well; when she was a child, her mother favored ’20s- and ’30s-style accessories, and the designer carries that spirit with her.

The designer mined her memories of her mother’s 1960s style when creating her own line.

Though she trained as an artist, Szatmáry had always been interested in fashion. In the early 2000s, she started making bracelets and bags out of natural leather that she sold in “arty” stores in Stockholm. She enrolled in a master’s course in accessories at Rome’s Istituto Europeo di Design. After graduating at the top of her class, the headmaster connected Szatmáry with “a guy” who needed an assistant. The “guy” turned out to be Gaetano Perrone, then working at Alexander McQueen. “This was when Lee [Alexander McQueen] was in the studio with Katy England,” Szatmáry recalls. “It was a very intense period [with] the Spring 2007 flower [and] the Spring 2006 Greek goddesses show, [and] accessories were growing.” From there, she was headhunted to Celine, and worked for Elie Saab and Paco Rabanne. She was also tapped to create an accessories collection, Susan Ibrahim for & Other Stories.

The success of that project convinced Szatmáry that the time was right to go solo—and to go luxury. “I really, really love making beautiful things and quality things,” explains the designer, whose bags are handmade in Italy of naturally dyed calf leather, with gold-dipped and brushed-brass hardware. In her new collection, Szatmáry was able to give form to concepts she had accumulated and banked for years while working for others. “I just kept all these ideas from the bottom of my heart that I wanted to do for a long time,” she says. Now, these treasures are buried no more.

[“source=forbes]

Looking for some indie Irish jewellery or accessories? Here’s all the best Black Friday offers

BLACK FRIDAY SALES are in full swing. We’ve rounded up some of the best fashion and beauty deals over here, but of course you’re gonna need some accessories to go with that.

With that in mind, here are a bunch of Irish-owned jewellery and accessory businesses giving offers on Friday and over the weekend.

Chupi – Chupi have a Black Friday offer which they aren’t revealing until tomorrow, but if you have your eye on a piece you might want to wait around.

Custom Vintage – They’re offering 15% off all jewellery today, and 20% off everything online tomorrow.

Glitz n Pieces – You can get 20% everything from Friday until midnight Monday with the code BLACKFRIDAY. Feeling v patriotic looking at this lil Ireland necklace.

PastedImage-76721 Source: Glitz n Pieces

Juvi Designs – Get a free star bracelet worth €79 with a purchase over €79.

PastedImage-85570 Source: Juvi Designs

Lilywho – Lilywho do really lovely pieces and are offering 20% off everything excluding sale items on Friday using the code BF20 until Monday.

Loulerie – Loulerie is that fancy jewellery shop on Chatham Street and they’re offering 20% off everything from midnight tonight until midnight Monday.

Love of Luxe – You may have seen these personalised wallets or purses all over your fave’s Insta, now it’s your chance to get one with 40% selected products.

[“source=marketingweek]

The Best Accessories From The 2018 Derby Day

Derby Day 2018.

When it comes to spring racing outfits, the devil’s in the details.

On top of the bespoke dresses and designer fits, trackside outfits are made or broken by the styling. Whether it’s the right headwear—traditional hat or modern headpiece? Fussy or sleek? Matching or contrasting?—or the choice of shoes, accessories are everything.

So, of course, when it came to the first day of Melbourne’s Spring Racing Carnival, Derby Day, we put a close lens on the particulars. Taking note of those trackside—Team ELLE is set up inside the ELLE Lounge at the Birdcage—we tracked hats, headwear, bags, shoes and jewellery.

No accessory left unnoticed. Promise.

Photography by Danielle Castano.

Must Read: Designers Are Using Fashion to Get out the Vote, Influencers Are Becoming Investors

Designers are using fashion to get out the vote
“This election cycle, getting out the vote is not just a talking, or lobbying, point,” writes Vanessa Friedman for The New York Times. “It’s a product category.” As we gear up for the midterm elections, designers are selling everything from cotton T-shirts to cashmere sweaters emblazoned with statements urging us to head to the polls. With thoughts from Prabal Gurung and Tory Burch, Friedman explains how this new wave of political fashion is using “clothes as an overt expression of values to be worn all the time, anywhere.” {The New York Times}

Influencers are becoming investors in droves
A growing number of fashion, beauty and lifestyle brands are looking beyond Silicon Valley to the world of social media to raise funding. These up-and-coming brands are handing over stakes in their companies to digital influencers – like Leandra Medine and Arielle Charnas – in exchange for a small cash investment. In turn, the brands receive long-term commitments from well-known backers who provide everything from industry contacts to enthusiastic promotion on Instagram. And if the brand takes off, early backers can find themselves sitting on stakes worth millions of dollars. {Business of Fashion}

Chanel announces upcoming collaboration with Pharrell Williams
Pharrell Williams is furthering his longstanding relationship with Chanel by designing a ready-to-wear and accessories capsule collection for the brand’s Spring 2019 season. Previously, Williams served as a campaign star, runway model, composer and sneaker collaborator for the French fashion house. Details of the range are still scarce, but Chanel revealed that the collection will debut exclusively on Mar. 29 at its new Seoul flagship, followed by select Chanel boutiques around the world from April 4. {Fashionista inbox}

ShopStyle will roll out new features to help influencers beat the algorithm
ShopStyle, which is comprised of both an influencer network and a social search engine, will roll out three new features aimed at helping influencers combat algorithm changes by monetizing even more content. Set to debut on Nov. 14, the features will allow influencers to embed shoppable links within their YouTube videos and give shoppers the option to be notified when a product from an influencer’s page in their favorites goes on sale. ShopStyle will also add “trend pages” that will highlight original influencer content. {WWD}

Milk Makeup and Wu-Tang collaborated on lipsticks
Milk Makeup announced its first-ever collaboration on Thursday, a range of Wu-Tang x Milk Makeup lip colors that includes eight shades designed to “honor Wu-Tang and Milk Makeup’s shared origins in storied New York culture and knowledge,” according to a release. “We wanted our first collaboration to be with a seminal icon who moves between culture and music and helped shape a generation,” said Milk Founder Mazdack Rassi. {Fashionista inbox}

How fast fashion affects mental health
Fast fashion not only takes a heavy toll on the environment; it also has serious effects on your brain, mental health and overall well-being. This is because, in the past, most people outgrew their overspending habits as their maturing personal style priced them out of such options. But thanks to the rise of fast fashion, people of all ages are seeing shopping as a more accessible way to cope with their feelings around anxiety and depression. {Well+Good}

Travis Scott stars in Saint Laurent’s Spring 2019 campaign
Travis Scott stars in Saint Laurent‘s Spring 2019 campaign wearing some statement pieces from the label’s menswear range, including a sequined jacket. The ad, which was shot by David Sims, maintains the French luxury house’s iconic black and white visual codes and sexy rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic. {Fashionista inbox}

Travis Scott for Saint Laurent Spring 2019. Photo: David Sims

 

[“source=Fashionista “]